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Tributes to Garett Kamemoto



University of Hawaii Journalism Degree and Program Saved

Thank you for supporting Hawaii Journalism. We have achieved a victory but must remain vigilant.

UH Manoa Provost Michael Bruno says he was moved by the passionate, articulate and well-reasoned emails that he received in support of the Journalism program at UH Manoa.

The Provost now supports a revitalized Journalism program and details are being worked out. Important votes and decisions are coming up.

Bruno said the Journalism degree will remain, within a newly organized school.

Department Chairman Colin Moore said: "I think you can share the good news with SPJ and tell them that their letters worked! And that we don't need them to send any additional letters."

We will let you know if your advocacy is needed again - possibly on short notice.

Thank you, Stirling Morita and Steve Petranik of SPJ Hawaii, and Professor Ann Auman of UH Journalism.

10/2/20

Hawaii Chapter SPJ's opposition to UH journalism degree elimination



Dr. David Lassner, President
Bachman 202
University of Hawai'i System
Honolulu, HI 96822

Dr. Lassner:

To read Noelle Fuii-Oride's work is to know the University of Hawaii Journalism Program works and has impact.

I first met Noelle in 2015, when she interned at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser while also working for Ka Leo O Hawaii. She had a lot of skills learned from UH.

The following year, she interned for Hawaii Business magazine and blossomed, and was later hired as a reporter for the magazine. Quite a feat for a kid just out of school.

But that wasn't it.

Last month, the Hawaii Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists awarded her three first place trophies in its annual contest, including the highly prized Body of Work (Best Writer) category.

If you end the UH Journalism Program, you narrow that avenue for local journalists.

I personally find the elimination of the program objectionable, and here are many other reasons:

The solution is NOT to eliminate the journalism B.A. degree program

We understand the need for budget cuts. But the answer is not to eliminate the program, which supports a cornerstone of a democratic society. We ask you to allow journalism faculty, the School of Communications and the Dean of Social Sciences to come up with cost efficiencies based on their knowledge of their field and students' needs. We ask you not to sidestep the people who know about journalism and just wipe the important program.

The UH Journalism Program does its job in preparing students to work in local news media.

The people of Hawaii need journalists trained in fact-based reporting, and that's what UH Journalism provides. It is the only stand-alone journalism program in the state.

More than 60 journalists trained at UH M?noa report and edit at local newspapers, TV stations, radio stations, websites and magazines today. Over the years, that number is well over 100. Some have gone onto distinguished careers in public relations, government affairs, law and other fields where their journalism training served them and Hawaii. In fact, quite a few public relations personnel started out as journalists.

UH Journalism instructors teach how to gather facts for articles and to write them in a way that doesn't show bias to one side or another - an important talent in this day of opinions in a divided society.

UH Journalism enrollment has grown.

The demand for journalism training remains strong: Enrollment was up 50 percent in Fall 2020.

Writing, research and interviewing skills are important for many careers, whether they are used by a reporter, a public relations person, a lawyer or other professional. Those skills are honed in the UH journalism program along with the multimedia skills needed to communicate across today's many platforms: the internet, TV, radio, print, video, podcasts and social media.

The provost's Journalism Lite proposal would not give students the skills they need.

The provost's proposal is to stop accepting new students next year and eliminate the Journalism B.A. program in favor of a Journalism minor as part of a Communications B.A. The change would not give students the journalism skills they need to serve Hawaii. Today, a Journalism B.A. requires 36 credits of Journalism courses. The provost's proposal would only require 15 credits for a Journalism minor. It's likely that Journalism courses that are now required would not even be offered. The Communication program offers many interesting classes but limited skills training: Communication students mostly study about communication but don't produce communication. In Journalism, students learn by doing real reporting, writing and production.

The UH administration should drop the provost's proposal of ending admissions to the Journalism major program in the Spring 2021. Students are planning their futures now: This proposal needs to be withdrawn immediately or it will hurt future enrollment. In effect, you would be ending the program starting in 2021. It would seem to be a self-fulfilling prophecy to justify the recommendation.

The proposal would not provide much in savings and yet not provide enough instruction in journalism. The few remaining classes would not be enough to prepare students for the present and future of journalism in areas such as multimedia. If the journalism program is maintained, it can also provide firm foundations for other programs such as public relations.

More training and potential shortage of students to be interns in Hawaii.

If UH guts the Journalism program, local news media would be forced to hire more and more journalists trained at Mainland universities, many of them unfamiliar with Hawaii. We need more - not fewer - reporters and editors raised and trained in Hawaii with a deep understanding of local issues, politics, culture and traditions.

(I offer as an example: Two political analysts in the daily newspapers were schooled in the UH Journalism Program: Jerry Burris of the Honolulu Advertiser and Richard Borreca. Ken Kobayashi, probably the finest legal affairs reporter who worked mostly at the Advertiser, also is an UH Journalism grad.)

Television news wouldn't be able to use UH students as interns, drying up the number of interns locally who could get a foot in the door to be hired. In fact, UH could lose many internships because they wouldn't be qualified with a diluted journalism education. The attraction for news media is the afterschool availability of interns - something that can't be done with students at Mainland universities.

The Hawaii Professional Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists provides more than $20,000 each summer for paid internships. Many of those paid interns come from UH. The number of qualified intern candidates would probably shrink if UH Journalism is gutted. Not all students can afford to go to Mainland schools for journalism programs.

Strong foundation for internships and jobs.

The UH Journalism Program is more demanding than the cafeteria-style Communications program, which attracts many more students because it's more flexible. However, the more rigorous Journalism program prepares students for internships and careers upon graduation. Those are the young people who get hired by local news media.

UH Journalism has prepared students for internships and jobs. Almost all local news media operations - big and small - have UH Journalism graduates on staff. The provost's proposal would cripple the program just as enrollment is increasing. There are currently 61 UH Journalism graduates on staff at local media outlets.

Journalism creates good citizens. Students learn the political process, how public policy is made and how bills become law; they learn the importance of informed voting and understand many issues. They apply the First Amendment in public service to Hawaii.

Journalism is not just a career, it is a service that is fundamental to our democracy, where it is considered the Fifth Estate and watchdog on government wrongdoing.

Provost's recommendation for Journalism Lite is based on outdated data and provides no cost savings.

The provost's proposal takes some of its data from a 2016 review. In reality, the number of Journalism majors is up 50 percent in Fall 2020 to 58 majors, not down to 38.

The provost lists no cost savings, but there are huge costs to the future of fact-based reporting: national studies have shown that when fact-based reporting disappears, people get their information from social media - allowing fake news, conspiracy theories and disinformation to take over. We need trained journalists who can counter those disturbing trends which are undermining democracy.

What is worse is that the provost's report is a poor example of analysis. It does not provide basic information, makes assumptions about popularity, ignores the responsibility to help provide students with the means to give the public information it needs to function in a democratic society, and most of all it ignores impact. It will affect internships and jobs for UH grads.

Journalism is not dying - it is changing. UH Journalism trains its graduates for a present and future in which people get their information from news media via the Internet, podcasts, video as well as traditional news platforms like print, TV and radio. The alternatives to trained journalists are disinformation, partisan social media and conspiracy theory-laden websites. As more colleges dump journalism, who will provide us with trustworthy information. There are many digital soapboxes out there, and education of those running them in ethics and other foundations. Just think of it: Where will you get your information in the future if reliable sources dry up?

UH should be building its award-winning Journalism program, not gutting it.

UH Journalism students won 23 awards this year from the Society of Professional Journalists on top of dozens of other awards won in the past two years. A $100,000 donation from Carol Burnett to UH Journalism is just one of 17 that support journalism students and the program. In fact, when Burnett's donation was mentioned by an audience member at her March 6, 2020 performance at the Blaisdell Concert Hall, it received among the biggest applause of the night.

The Journalism B.A. program contributes to all three of the university's Institutional Learning Objectives: Know, Do and Value.

o Know: Specialized study in an academic field.
o Do: Students improve their abilities to think critically and creatively, conduct research, and communicate and report.
o Value: Students demonstrate excellence, integrity, and engagement through civic participation in their communities.

Journalism is a responsibility to society. Letting the electorate know what is going on in government and society is recognized as a pillar of a democracy as immortalized in the First Amendment's freedom of the press provision. If or when the economy improves, will the Journalism Lite program be in a position to be expanded back to its original setup, where what you learn substance rather than form?

UH Journalism allows the University to reach into the community. Its students perform a public service by providing fact-based news that is essential to democracy and civil society. A robust UH Journalism program reflects well on the University. Poor or inadequate journalism training harms the University's reputation.

Public TV President Leslie Wilcox is a grad, and KHON's News Director Lori Silva graduated from the UH Journalism Program. Also a grad is Hawaii News Now's Assignment Editor Brenda Salgado, undoubtedly the best in town. UH Journalism grad Lucy Young (-Oda) is the editorial page editor for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

At last count, there were 61 UH grads working in the local news media:

KHET (Hawaii Public Television) Leslie Wilcox, Chuck Parker, Anna Gomes
KHPR (Hawaii Public Radio) Sandee Oshiro, Harrison Patino, Jackie Young
Honolulu Star-Advertiser: Lucy Young-Oda, John Bender, George Lee, Jamm Aquino, Mark Ladao, Charlene Robinson; Gordon Pang, Ruben Duldulao, Ruby Mata Viti, Brian McInnis, Robert Shikina, Rosemarie C. Bernardo, Kristen K. Sawada Patricia A. Gee, Stephen Tsai
KHON Channel 2: Reid Shimizu. Jennifer Brink, Lori Silva, Chanel Miura, Kristine Uyeno, Lance Kuraoka Tina DeMello, Benjamin Silva, Karen Iwamoto, Nelson Daranciang, Mokihana Aki, Joie Nishimoto, Tasha Tanimoto, Kimberlee Speakman, Manolo Morales, Jenn Boneza, Christian Shimabuku
KITV: Victoria Cuba, Cherry Pascual, Bianca Smallwood, Bobby Bergonio, Nicole Tam
Hawaii News Now: Josh Benton, Mary Vorsino, Dillon Ancheta, Daryl Huff, Brenda Salgado, Jim Mendoza, Daniel Nunes, Keahi Tucker, Lacy Deniz, Joe Barruso
MidWeek: Yushing Ting
Honolulu Magazine: Christi Young, Robbie Dingeman, Stacey Makiya
Hawaii Business: Noelle Fujii-Oride
Maui News: Melissa K. Tanji, Stefanie Nakasone (Brian Perry, now the Maui mayor's spokesman)
Environment Hawaii: Teresa A. Dawson

Thank you for your attention,

Stirling Morita
President, Hawaii Professional Chapter of Society of Professional Journalists

Saving UH Journalism



On Oct. 15, the University of Hawai'i Board of Regents will meet to discuss the university's budget crisis, including a proposal to eliminate the UH Journalism B.A. Program.

We believe the university shouldn't gut the only journalism degree program in the state.

We are asking you to make your feelings known to UH President David Lassner, UH M?noa Provost Michael Bruno and the UH Board of Regents. Please feel free to forward this request to colleagues, friends and others who might feel the same way as we do. They do not have to be UH Journalism grads. Please put "Save Hawai'i Journalism" in the subject line of your emails to UH leaders.

Send an email now to:

Dr. Michael Bruno, M?noa Provost mbruno2@hawaii.edu

Dr. David Lassner, UH President david@hawaii.edu

Copy UH M?noa Communications Chair Colin Moore at cdmoore@hawaii.edu

After sending your email, submit written testimony to the Board of Regents no later than Oct. 13. Use this email: bor.testimony@hawaii.edu

If you wish to testify orally, use the same email address to register no later than 7 a.m. on day of the Regents meeting, Oct. 15.

Suggested talking points and text for your emails are in an attached Word document.

Please join us in opposing the gutting or elimination of UH Journalism.

Thank you,

Stirling Morita, Steve Petranik and Professor Ann Auman
For the Hawaii Professional Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists

Hawai'i Journalism Needs Your Support: What You Need to Know



Please put "Save Hawai'i Journalism" in the subject line of your email.

1. Issue: Alumni and supporters of UH Journalism understand the university must make budget cuts. The solution is to allow journalism faculty, the School of Communications and the Dean of Social Sciences to create cost efficiencies based on their knowledge of their field and their students' needs and wants. The solution is NOT to eliminate the journalism B.A. degree program.

2. Issue: Now more than ever, the people of Hawai'i need journalists trained in fact-based reporting. That's what UH Journalism provides and it is the only stand-alone journalism program in the state. More than 100 journalists trained at UH M?noa form the backbone of reporting and editing staff at local newspapers, TV stations, websites and magazines today and for decades past. Others have gone on to distinguished careers in public relations, government affairs, law and other fields where their journalism training served them and Hawai'i well.

Other possible wording for emails:

o Thanks to UH journalism instructors, I learned how to gather facts for articles and write them in a way that didn't show bias to one side or another - an important talent in this day of opinions in a divided society.
o Like others, I got a job in a local newsroom because of what I learned at UH Journalism.

3. Issue: The demand for journalism training remains strong: Enrollment was up 50 percent in Fall 2020. Students want the real-world skills that journalism provides in clear and concise writing, broadcast news, research and interviewing skills, media ethics and law, and much more.

Other possible wording for emails:

o Writing, research and interviewing skills are important for many careers, whether they are used by a reporter, a public relations person, a lawyer or other professional. Those skills are honed in the UH journalism program along with the multimedia skills needed to communicate across today's many platforms: the internet, TV, radio, print, video, podcasts and social media.

4. Issue: The provost's proposal is to stop accepting new students now and eliminate the Journalism B.A. program in favor of a Journalism minor as part of a Communications B.A. The change would not give students the skills they need to serve Hawai'i. Today, a Journalism B.A. requires 36 credits of Journalism courses. The provost's proposal would only require 15 credits for a Journalism minor. It's likely that Journalism courses that are now required would not even be offered. The Communication program offers many interesting classes but limited skills training: Communication students mostly study about communication but don't produce communication. In Journalism, students learn by doing real reporting, writing and production.

Other possible wording for emails:

o The UH administration should drop the provost's proposal of ending admissions to the Journalism major program in the Spring 2021. Students are planning their futures now: This proposal needs to be withdrawn immediately or it will hurt future enrollment. In effect, you would be ending the program starting in 2021.
o We ask you to reject the provost's proposal. It would not provide much in savings and yet not provide enough instruction in journalism. The few remaining classes would not be enough to prepare students for the present and future of journalism in areas such as multimedia. If the journalism program is maintained, it can also provide firm foundations for other programs such as public relations.

5. Issue: If UH guts the Journalism program, local news media would be forced to hire more and more journalists trained at Mainland universities, many of them unfamiliar with Hawai'i. We need more - not fewer - reporters and editors raised and trained in Hawai'i with a deep understanding of local issues, politics, culture and traditions.

Other possible wording for emails:

o Television news wouldn't be able to use UH students as interns, drying up the number of interns who could get a foot in the door to be hired. In fact, I could see UH losing many internships because they wouldn't be qualified with a diluted journalism education.
o The Hawaii Professional Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists provides more than $20,000 each summer for paid internships. Many of those paid interns come from UH. The number of qualified intern candidates would probably shrink if UH Journalism is gutted. Not all students can afford to go to Mainland schools for journalism programs.

6. Issue: The UH Journalism program is more demanding than the free-form, cafeteria-style Communications program, which attracts many more students because it's more flexible. However, the more rigorous Journalism program prepares students for internships and careers upon graduation. Those are the young people who get hired by local news media.

Other possible wording for emails:

o UH Journalism has prepared students for internships and jobs. Almost all local news media operations - big and small - have UH Journalism graduates on staff. The provost's proposal would cripple the program just as enrollment is increasing.
oJournalism creates good citizens. Students learn the political process, how public policy is made and how bills become law; they learn the importance of informed voting and understand many issues. They apply the First Amendment in public service to Hawai'i.
o Journalism is not just a career, it is a public service that is fundamental to our democracy.

7. Issue: The provost's recommendation for Journalism Lite is based on outdated data, some of it from a 2016 review. In reality, the number of Journalism majors is up 50 percent in Fall 2020 to 58 majors. The Journalism Lite proposal lists no cost savings. But there are huge costs to the future of fact-based reporting: national studies have shown that when fact-based reporting disappears, people get their information from social media - allowing fake news, conspiracy theories and disinformation to take over. We need trained journalists who can counter those disturbing trends which are undermining democracy.

Other possible wording for emails:

o Journalism is not dying - it is changing. UH Journalism trains its graduates for a present and future in which people get their information from fact-based news media via the internet, podcasts, video as well as traditional news platforms like print, TV and radio. The alternatives to trained journalists are disinformation, partisan social media and conspiracy theory-laden websites.

8. Issue: UH should be building its award-winning Journalism program, not gutting it. UH Journalism students won 23 awards this year from the Society of Professional Journalists on top of dozens of other awards won in the past two years. A $100,000 donation from Carol Burnett to UH Journalism is just one of 17 that support journalism students and the program. In fact, when Burnett's donation was mentioned by an audience member at her March 6, 2020 performance at the Blaisdell Concert Hall, it received among the biggest applause of the night.

9. Issue: The Journalism B.A. program contributes to all three of the university's Institutional Learning Objectives: Know, Do and Value.

o Know: Specialized study in an academic field.
o Do: Students improve their abilities to think critically and creatively, conduct research, and communicate and report.
o Value: Students demonstrate excellence, integrity, and engagement through civic participation in their communities.

Other possible wording for emails:

o UH Journalism allows the University to reach into the community. Its students perform a public service by providing fact-based news that is essential to democracy and civil society. A robust UH Journalism program reflects well on the University. Poor or inadequate journalism training harms the University's reputation.


8/11/20

SPJ ethics chairwoman says MidWeek political ad did not have sufficient disclosure



Here are letters from Hawaii Chapter SPJ protesting that MidWeek ran what appeared to be a news story about mayoral Keith Amemiya without prominently disclosing that it was a paid political ad.



Dennis Francis
President, Oahu Publications Inc.
500 Ala Moana Blvd. #7-500
Honolulu, HI 96813

Mr. Francis,

We are following up on our complaint that MidWeek’s double-truck cover story on Honolulu mayoral candidate Keith Amemiya on July 22 did not contain “prominent” disclosure that it was a political advertisement in apparent violation of the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists.

The chairwoman of the SPJ Ethics Committee agrees.

Chair Lynn Walsh, also former national SPJ president, said in an email:

“If content is sponsored or advertising, it should be labeled as such. Those labels should be clear and come at the beginning of the story, not at the end. In this case, if I was a reader, I would not know this story was a paid advertisement. It looks like a regular news story. There is not a clear differentiation until the very end. Not all users are going to read until the end and if they don't read until the end, they would miss the note that says it was an advertisement. What would be better, is there was some sort of label on the headline or at the top of the story. If we do not clearly label content as sponsored or as advertising, we are deceiving our users and our communities.”

Again, the SPJ Ethics Code says: “Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two. Prominently label sponsored content.”

We note that you have made comments that everyone knows MidWeek has been a vehicle for advertising. Does that mean all the cover stories of MidWeek were paid advertising?

You know that is not an excuse for failing to prominently disclose that a cover and double-truck article is paid advertising. For many years, your staff has featured people in the community worthy of note and paid well-known journalists to write those articles. Are we to understand that “everyone” knows that those articles are advertising? We think not.

Accordingly, we ask you to prominently disclose articles such as the one written about Keith Amemiya as advertising – if they are paid for or made in exchange for services or products.

Our complaint had nothing to do with Mr. Amemiya’s candidacy, and should not be interpreted as such.

Please remember that the Ethics Code is there to promote public trust in the media.

Thank you for your attention,

Stirling Morita
President
Hawaii Professional Chapter SPJ


Dennis Francis
President, Oahu Publications Inc.
500 Ala Moana Blvd. #7-500
Honolulu, HI 96813

Mr. Francis,

It was with chagrin and a bit of dismay that I finished reading MidWeek’s double-truck cover story on Honolulu mayoral candidate Keith Amemiya. It ended with a note tucked at the end that it was a “paid advertisement.”

The disclosure was not enough. The Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists says: “Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two. Prominently label sponsored content.”

Your disclosure at the end of the article did not do that. It was not prominently labeled. It appeared to be more of an afterthought than a thought-out disclosure.

While the cover photo and double-truck article amounted to a “political pamphlet” in a publication with big market penetration, we have no opinion about Mr. Amemiya other than to say that such an article could prove invaluable in such a crowded and tight mayoral primary election in a little more than two weeks.

While the opportunity for such an “ad” was offered to all the mayoral candidates, you gave Mr. Amemiya the chance to reach voters based on the ability to pay when the basis for news is the importance of the information or the interest in the person. INFORMATION, NOT MONEY.

We appreciate that there will be so-called hybrids with the changing economic climate and deteriorating revenues, but news should come first, and when it is promoting a product or person for pay, that DISCLOSURE should be made prominently so people can judge the value of the information imparted. In this case, how many people made it to the end of the story? I dare say probably not a lot. So they missed out on the disclosure and thought they were reading an “impartial” news story.

You might say what is it to me. It means a lot. It means a lot that we are losing trust (and circulation) with the reading public. When things like this happen, we all lose a bit of trust with the public, not just you, not just MidWeek, not just the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, not just other reporters. We all lose something. People oftentimes don’t remember what caused them to say “You can’t believe all you read” or “They can’t get it right” or “You’ve got to pay to get your story told.” What they do remember is something that diminishes journalism.

Therefore, I am filing a complaint with the Ethics Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Thank you for your attention,

Stirling Morita
President
Hawaii Professional Chapter SPJ


6/1/19

Thanks to the judges of the contest by the Louisville Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

These judges' actions allowed for the Louisville Chapter to judge the Hawaii Chapter's contest.

Here are the judges:

Aaron Yoshino
Ann Auman
Brett Oppegaard
Catherine Toth Fox
Charlene Robinson
Cheryl Oncea
Christi Young
Cody Krupp
Dave Reardon
David Croxford
Derrick Malama
Jason Taglianetti
Jeff Hawe
Jenn Boneza
Jennifer Wong
Joe Guinto, who judged the Overall Magazine Page Design category of the Hawaii Contest
Joelle Cabasa
Kathy Muneno
Kelsey Ige
Kevin Allen
Kristin Lipman
Linda Dela Cruz
Lucy Young Oda
Nancy Cook Lauer
Robbie Dingeman
Steve Petranik
Stirling Morita
Sunshine Kuhia Smith
Teresa Dawson


1/30/19

Prize-winning columnist: Journalists can win against Trump's false claims




Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist Ellis Henican has a way to counter President Trump's false claims of fake news and of journalists as "enemy of the people."

At a talk Jan. 30 at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Henican, who writes a weekly column called Trump's America, outlined steps the news media ought to take:

1. Don't make mistakes.
2. Make good use of technology. "We can do technology better than Donald Trump."
3. Use the old-fashioned method of gathering facts and finding articles.
4. Talk with people you may disagree with.
5. Provide depth, background, context and perspective in articles.

IRE WATCHDOG WORKSHOP FEB. 9-10

Investigative Reporters and Editors will bring its acclaimed watchdog workshop series to Honolulu, on Saturday, Feb. 9.

Get a free (or extended) one-year IRE membership and all-day training on how to ramp up your watchdog skills at the workshop co-hosted by The University of Hawaii School of Communications; Society of Professional Journalists--Hawaii Chapter; Asian American Journalists Association--Hawaii Chapter; and Media Council Hawaii.

You'll learn tips from some of the top investigative journalists from print, TV and online newsrooms. Our speakers are Cody Winchester and Charles Minshew, both from IRE & NICAR; Bigad Shaban from NBC Bay Area; John Hill from Honolulu Civil Beat; and Brian Black of Civil Beat Law Center for Public Interest.

Sessions are designed for all journalists looking to improve their data and reporting skills. Freelancers and students are also encouraged to attend.

Registration includes a one-year IRE membership, giving you access to reporting tipsheets, training resources and more. Current members receive a one-year extension.

In addition, you may register for hands-on spreadsheet training on Sunday, Feb. 10, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This beginner class teaches you how to use spreadsheets to find stories. Reserve your spot today, as space in the computer lab is limited.

Find additional information, including the schedule, pricing and registration details, at https://www.ire.org/events-and-training/event/4115

We encourage you to share this with any colleagues who might be interested.

This program is made possible thanks to support from the Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation.

We look forward to seeing you in Honolulu on Feb. 9!

-- VICKI L. FRIEDMAN
Marketing & Communications Assistant
Investigative Reporters & Editors
(757) 373-0477



5/10/17
Thanks to the Judges

The Louisville Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists judged the Hawaii 2016 contest. Honolulu Star-Advertiser Managing Editors Betty Shimabukuro and Mike Rovner judge the Magazine Overall Page Design category. The following judges judged the Louisville contest:

Environment Hawai'i
Teresa Dawson
Pat Tummons

Hawaii News Now
Jobeth Devera
Scott Humber
Mahealani Richardson
Brenda Salgado

Hawaii Public Radio
Bill Dorman

KHON2
Mokihana Aki
Linda Dela Cruz
Rob Demello
Jennifer Humphrey
Ben Silva
Marisa Yamane

Pacific Business News
Janis Magin
Kam Napier

PacificBasin Communications
Robbie Dingeman
Catherine Toth Fox
Kelsey Ige
Daniel Ito
Anne Lee
Lavonne Leong
Kristin Lipman
Christi Young

Honolulu Civil Beat
Patti Epler
Nick Grube
Rui Kaneya
Jessica Terrell

Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Sjarif Goldstein
Martha Hernandez
Nanea Kalani
Stirling Morita
Dennis Oda
Charlene Robinson
Christie Wilson
Lucy Young Oda

University of Hawaii
Julien Gorbach
Brett Oppegaard

West Hawaii Today
Nancy Cook Lauer



Aloha, Wally

CLICK HERE FOR TRIBUTE

Wally Zimmermann's memorial
was held March 3 at Maunalua
Bay.Family sets up memorial fund.
SPJ's TV internships named after
Zimmermann
CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

Facebook: Wally Zimmermann
Internships in Television
Broadcast Journalism



3/7/16
Thank you to the Hawaii judges of
the Colorado SPJ Top of the Rockies

Environment Hawai’I: Teresa Dawson, Pat Tummons

Honolulu Star-Advertiser: John Bender Jackie Carberry, Christina Chun, Susan Essoyan, Sjarif Goldstein, Martha Hernandez, Stirling Morita, Curtis Murayama, Charlene Robinson, Lucy Young Oda

West Hawaii Today: Nancy Cook Lauer

Honolulu magazine: Robbie Dingeman, Alyson Helwagen, Kristin Lipman, Lennie Omalza, Cat Toth

Honolulu Family Magazine: Christi Young

Hawaii Home and Remodeling Magazine: Tom Kunz

Hawaii Magazine: Matthew Dekneef, Christine Hitt

Hawaii Business: Jen Tadaki Catanzariti, Warren Daubert, Gina Gelber, Dennis Hollier, Steve Petranik

Circle of Blue: Codi Kozacek

Former AP: Dave Briscoe

Maui News: Brad Sherman

Hawaii Public Radio: Bill Dorman



5/11/15
Thanks to the Hawaii judges of
the Connecticut contest

Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Christina Chun
Stirling Morita

Charlene Robinson

Lucy Young-Oda

KITV

Lara Yamada
Pacific Basin Communications

Kristin Lipman
Christi Young


4/21/15
Thanks to the Hawaii judges
of the Kansas City Press Club contest

Associated Press

Dave Briscoe, retired

Circle of Blue

Codi Kozacek

Environment Hawaii

Teresa Dawson

Hawaii News Now

Keoki Kerr

Brenda Salgado

Hawaii Public Radio

Bill Dorman

Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Susan Essoyan

Sjarif Goldstein

Stirling Morita

Curtis Murayama

Christie Wilson

KHON

Jennnifer Brink

Sean Ibara

Justin Kanno

Marisa Yamane

KITV

Robert Kekaula

Nathan Serota

Pacific Basin Communications

Mike Keany
Diane Lee

Lennie Omalza

Trade Publishing

David Putnam

West Hawaii Today

Nancy Cook Lauer



4/18/15
Ernie Pyle memorial

ERNIE PYLE LEGACY FOUNDATION

Ernie Pyle Legacy Foundation Hosts 70th Anniversary Memorial Event

On April 18 the Ernie Pyle Legacy Foundation will host the Ernie Pyle 70th

Anniversary Memorial Ceremony, in Honolulu at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific

where Pyle is buried. The ceremony is to commemorate the death of World War II Scripps-

Howard feature columnist and foreign correspondent Ernie Pyle who was killed in 1945 by

enemy fire.

A memorial stone will be dedicated to honor both the soldiers who gave their lives in WWII and

Pyle who was embedded with them and reported on their personal stories that appeared in 400

daily and 300 weekly newspapers across the country. Key speaker includes Indiana University

Associate Professor Emeritus Owen Johnson.

The event starts at 9:45 a.m. April 18, 2015 at Punchbowl.

About the Ernie Pyle Legacy Foundation:

The Ernie Pyle Legacy Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to maintaining

the memory and legacy of World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle. The Ernie Pyle Legacy

Foundation recognizes Ernie Pyle’s contributions to the United States military and to the

journalism profession through public events, scholarships, and educational programs. For more

information, please visit erniepylefoundation.org or “like” us on Facebook.

Ernie Pyle was a pioneering World War II correspondent who was killed on April 18, 1945.

Born in Dana, Indiana, Pyle was one of the most influential reporters in both the European and Pacific

theatres throughout the war.

Pyle, who wrote as a roving correspondent for the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain, won a Pulitzer

Prize in 1944 for his first-person portrayals of the common American soldier.

He is currently at rest at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific located in Honolulu.

The Ernie Pyle Legacy Foundation is a 501(c)(3) foundation created by the closest living relatives of

Ernie Pyle in order to preserve his venerable reputation.

The foundation will endeavor to create public awareness of the journalistic accomplishments of Ernie

Pyle among generations of Americans who did not benefit from his reporting during that period of

global conflict.

On April 18, 2015, a major event will be held at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific to

commemorate the 70th Anniversary of Pyle’s honorable sacrifice for his country.

Prominent guests and speakers will attend along with patriotic music and ceremonies.

The highlight of the event will be the dedication of a memorial stone, honoring Pyle as well as all of

the soldiers who gave their lives and the journalists who told their stories.



5/20/14

Congratulations to Phoebe Fox, La Pietra School for Girls student who won second place in the national SPJ high school essay contest. She is the daughter of Colette Pritchard Fox, longtime SPJ Hawaii member.
 

Download  Winning  Essay


4/20/14

Thanks to the judges of the Top of the Rockies contest:

Board members:
Dave Briscoe

Teresa Dawson

Nancy Cook Lauer

Christy Strobel

Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Richard Borreca

Nanea Kalani

Stirling Morita

Curtis Murayama

Mary Poole

Dave Shapiro

Christie Wilson

Alan Yonan

Lucy Young-Oda

PacificBasin Communications
Jen Tadako Catanzariti

Dennis Hollier

Kristin Lipman

Lennie Omalza

Steve Petranik

Christi Young